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why loss education matters

Why grief education matters

Find out more about why we believe a proactive approach to grief education for children, young people and those supporting them is vital to support the well-being and life outcomes for children and young people that experience loss.

Magnifying glass with piece of paper, speech bubble, eye and heart

Why grief education matters

Find out more about why we believe a proactive approach to grief education for children, young people and those supporting them is vital to support the well-being and life outcomes for children and young people that experience loss.

Magnifying glass with piece of paper, speech bubble, eye and heart

Why grief education matters

Find out more about why we believe a proactive approach to grief education for children, young people and those supporting them is vital to support the well-being and life outcomes for children and young people that experience loss.

Magnifying glass with piece of paper, speech bubble, eye and heart

Understanding loss is an essential part of the human experience

For children and young people, navigating loss can be particularly challenging, and the role of those who support them is paramount. We are dedicated to exploring the significance of grief education for the younger generation and the adults who guide them through these difficult experiences.

Some key statistics

There are different forms of loss that we can all experience, such as the death of a loved one, the end of a relationship, or even the loss of a job. Here are some key statistics about how many children and young people are affected by loss in the UK.

1 in 20

children and young people have experienced the death of one or both parents by the age of 16. (Parsons, 2011)

78%

of 11-16 year olds in one survey said they had been bereaved of a close relative or friend (Harrison and Harrington, 2001).

100,000

More than 100,000 children have a parent in prison. Prison Advice and Care Trust (Pact), 2003

3.6mil

3.6 million

3.6 million

At the end of 2021 it was estimated that 3.6 million children are from separated families.

Breaking the taboo

"People should just talk about it, and not feel awkward. It's one of the things we all have in common. Not only do you have to deal with grief yourself, you also have to deal with how others might feel about it."

Teigan, 20

Firefly Youth advocate, bereaved at 11

Let's get proactive

Here is how proactive approaches to grief education such as The Firefly Project can help

Empowering emotional resilience

grief education for children and young people empowers emotional resilience. It equips them with the emotional intelligence and coping mechanisms necessary to face adversity with strength and understanding. By providing a safe space for discussion and support, we foster individuals who can not only overcome challenges but also thrive in the face of them.

Nurturing open communication

Effective communication is key when dealing with loss. Through grief education, we encourage open dialogues that allow children and young people to express their feelings and concerns. This transparent communication with parents, caregivers, and educators ensures that no child feels isolated in their grief.

Building empathy and compassion

Our workshops help Children and young people to develop their empathy and compassion skills. By understanding the experiences of others, they learn to support their peers during challenging times and extend a helping hand when needed. This culture of empathy enriches their lives and the lives of those around them.

Reducing the stigma of grief

Grief can be isolating, especially for the younger generation. Grief education strives to diminish the stigma associated with loss. By creating a more accepting and understanding society, we empower children and young people to seek help when they need it, ultimately enhancing their emotional well-being.

Fostering lifelong coping skills

The skills acquired through grief education are not limited to loss alone. They become lifelong coping strategies that can be applied to various challenges. This preparation empowers children and young people to lead more balanced and resilient lives.

Strengthening support systems

Grief education is not only for children and young people but also for those who support them – parents, teachers, counsellors, and caregivers. It equips these adults with the knowledge and skills needed to provide effective support and guidance during times of loss.

Create a ripple effect

By nurturing the emotional well-being of young people, we lay the foundation for healthier, more resilient generations. Reduced feelings of loneliness and isolation not only benefit the individuals experiencing grief but also contribute to a more compassionate and connected world.

Contact

Are you part of school, college or university and looking to get involved with The Firefly Project? Get in touch with us by filling out the form below, and one of the team will get back to you.

© 2024 The Firefly Project

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© 2024 The Firefly Project

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© 2024 The Firefly Project

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